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If you had to rely on one zero, what would it be? For a long time, the mantra has been that the 50 / 200 yard zero is the most useful zero for the AR15 platform as it offers a flat trajectory for the 5. 56 cartridge. It is good advice and I have a few rifles zero’ed for 50 myself, but it’s not the “best zero”.

Maximum Hangtime: Getting the Most Out of your AR15 Zero

Maximum Hangtime: Getting the Most Out of your AR15 ZeroIf you had to rely on one zero, what would it be? For a long time, the mantra has been that the 50 / 200 yard zero is the most useful zero for the AR15 platform as it offers a flat trajectory for the 5.56 cartridge. It is good advice and I have a few rifles zero’ed for 50 myself, but it’s not the “best zero”. The 50 yard zero is a vanilla standard, as it suits almost everyone well… but each rifle or carbine is a unique combination of barrel length / velocity, bullet weight, and shooter. If each rifle setup is unique, then can we do better than a “vanilla” zero for each rig? Yes. What’s the Best Zero for my AR15? Many of you might have heard of the maximum point-blank range method of zeroing. MPBR is a zero scheme that is unique to your rifle and loading. It maximizes the “point-blank range” where you have to remember a single hold to get hits out to the end of the point-blank range, hence “maximum point-blank range.” As an example, imagine a disk six inches in diameter and I want to hit that disk as far out as possible with one zero. How would I do that? I would zero the rifle so that the trajectory of my bullet will arch 3 inches high and where the bullet would fall 3 inches below my line of sight, that would mark the end of my MPBR zero. That disk could be at 25, 100, 212, or 274.5 yards and a single-center hold would allow me to hit it with no need for holdover. Hunters have used this method for a while, but with the popularity of the bullet drop reticle, it has fallen by the wayside in recent years. So why not just use the bullet drop marks? Because time. Your target, be it defensive or hunting, will present you with an opportune shot for only a few seconds. Ranging and doping the target, even with a BDC reticle, may not happen fast enough and / or you may miscalculate. That 18 inch shoulder-width ACOG ranging system isn’t so useful if the target is standing sideways or presents only for a split second. We want to put rounds on target, with the highest probability to intersect the target, without having to try and estimate range. Anything inside of my MPBR I want to aim at and hit without worrying about holdover, hold under, or BDC stadia. That’s the beauty of the MPBR method, it allows you to tune your trajectory to tailor suit your rifle, your loading, and your target diameter. So how do we zero with this wunder method? Let’s start by expanding upon why we want to ditch the 50/200 zero mantra and see how things go with a 3 inch diameter MPBR: Point. Click. Hit. You need a ballistic calculator and some load data. I recommend Strelok on the itunes or android store. Strelok has a wonderful tool built in that lets you calculate the maximum point blank range right in the app and is a powerful tool. Let’s proceed with some more examples as to why MPBR is worth the trouble over a standard 50 yard zero. With a 50 yard zero in a 20-inch rifle, shooting XM193, you can expect a bullet apex (aka maximum ordinate) of flight to be close to 2 inches (by my calculations) and then it falls back to cross your line of sight again at 225 yards. Wait, it’s not over yet. As the bullet continues to fall, it will fall 2 inches below your line of sight at 259 yards. The maximum point blank zero here is 259 yards meaning you should be able to hit a 4-inch disk from 0-259 yards with a dead-center hold. Think of the MPBR as the acceptable vertical resolution where the bullet’s trajectory stays inside the defined size of the target. Now let’s bring it out a new MPBR zero which allows us to stretch that useful range out a bit more. Let’s zero so the maximum ordinate of our XM193 is 3 inches above the line of sight. Anything inside of my MPBR is in the danger zone with no need to hold over. This zero is actually a 264 yard zero which gives us a 3 inch rise and a 3 inch fall at 300 which marks the end of our MPBR. How do we zero at 264 yards? Use a ballistic calculator app such as Strelok! So if I am shooting a 20 inch AR15 with XM193 and a maximum bullet rise of 3 inches over my line of sight, then I just extended my MPBR to 300 yards where at that point the bullet would dip 3 inches below the line of sight. That has effectively changed our “resolution” to 6 inches where the bullet would stay in the defined target zone. A 6 inch resolution easily fits in the space occupied by a human head out to 300 yards! That means a dead hold to the middle of the face will *potentially* score head-shots out to darn near 300 yards! Remember, this sighting method is target size defined and shooter-rifle-projectile unique . Each rifle and loading will need to be entered in Strelok (or another ballistic calculator) to determine the best zero for your desired target diameter. Why does this apply to a defensive rifle/carbine? In a self-defense setup, we need to maximize the distance where we will hit our target *without* shot correction. If the target is inside our point-blank range… we want the rifle to be a simple “point and click” interface. Bam. Hit. We want the highest probability of hitting a head, torso, or half exposed limb. Point. Click. Hit. We want to maximize bullet “hang time” to increase the probability our projectile will hit the target at unknown distances. Click. Boom. Hit. So why not 4.5 inches up and down if the average head is 9 inches tall for an MPBR of 349 yards!? Why not a 3.5 inch zero for a 7-inch diameter vital zone!? Sure, you can do that. It’s all up to you and it all depends on your expectations of precision vs the diameter of the target. Remember that standard zero’s are made for shooter convenience and not what’s best for your rifle and projectile combo.  Ranges come in known distance increments and we pick a set distance to zero out of convenience. That 50 or 100 yard zero for your setup doesn’t stretch out the rifle or carbines maximum useful trajectory. So what should be our goal when we zero? Goal: increase the probability that the projectile will intersect the target *without* calculations. Factors: Rifle and bullet accuracy, shooter accuracy, target size, and environment. A defensive target, once engaged, will not stand up waiting to be shot. They will be hiding, returning fire, and they will present a small target for the shooter. Three inches of rise and fall (for a total of 6 inches of vital zone) gives us a great starting point for hitting hiding, peeking, or partially exposed targets. So instead of estimating range in a quick, violent engagement, I want to hold dead on and know that if my target is inside of 300 yards, that target is gonna get hit. This simplify’s ranging immensely. No holdovers. No hold unders either. My only question “is the target inside of 300 yards?” Yes? Then just a dead hold. Shooters with a red dot may find the MPBR method particularly useful, especially with a magnifier. Above Sig Romeo 5 with Juliet 3x magnifier Six inches of total vertical resolution seems like a logical choice for an MPBR setup and extends us past our 50 yard / 200 yard zero a bit and is still a fine resolution for engaging defensive targets. I can’t think of anything I would shoot at that would be missed because my trajectory apex is three inches high. Look at your knee. It likely has a targetable area of at least six inches. Torso? This 6 inch resolution is easily inside the vital zone of a center of mass hold. So next I whipped up a basic chart to get an idea of what zero at 100 yards I would need to get an MPBR which targets a 6 inch radius. XM193 and Mk 262: Sight in at 100 yards X inches high in blue for a bullet apex of 3 inches; the MPBR is in red for each barrel and projectile. The XM855 would benefit at similar zeros as it will be in between the MPBR of the 77 grain and 55 grain ammo. Barrel Length 10.5 14.5 16 18 20 xm193 2.6 2.4 2.5 2.2 2.0 MPBR 262 281 289 300 303 Mk 262 2.8 2.6 2.6 2.5 2.4 MPBR 242 261 270 279 284 So you can see there is a bit of difference in the MPBR between rifle, carbine, and bullet. At one end we have the longer point-blank range of the 55 grain XM193 and at the other end the heavier 77 Mk 262 at the other. With modern ballistic calculators such as Strelok, you can simply zero at 100 yards, input the maximum target diameter, take the recommended zero for your new MPBR and Strelok will tell you how many clicks up from 100 yards to achieve that zero goal. This method of sighting in gives you some excellent hit probability. If the target is near, a dead hold will hit anything in your maximum point blank range. If you estimate the target is at 300-400 yards, holding on the head will ensure rounds drop into the mid torso. If you were incorrect and your target was closer than you estimated, your projectile would still likely hit the head. It appears that M193 or, even better, a quality defensive 5.56 equivalent such as Hornady 55gr TAP would make the best choice because of the high velocity achieved by 55-grain loadings… but when wind is thrown into the equation the 55-grain stuff makes it more difficult to hit the small targets at the end of its MPBR. So let’s look at heavier match bullets, what benefit do they offer? Increased accuracy and increased wind resistance. Adding the Variables; wind, accuracy, and MPBR Typically M193 is considered a 1.5 to 2 MOA load and the 77 grain Mk 262 is considered a sub MOA load. Think of each bullet as a probability to hit an area based on its accuracy. Groupings are the defining measure of whether an MPBR zero will be effective as inaccurate ammo could possibly land too far away from our target radius to remain useful. If your gun cannot keep groups inside the defined zone, then the distance you have chosen won’t work very well since trying to keep the bullets in a 6 inch diameter target zone out to 300 yards won’t work if your rifle is shooting minute of barn. Ideally, you should start with an accurate, free-floated barrel, and use the best ammunition available to you. A rifle shooting terrible groups at (Say 4 inches at 100 yards) will not benefit from MPBR, as we must consider that at 200 yards the groupings would double to 8 inches, and at 300 the groupings would run around 12 inches. This eliminates the gains of our MPBR since many of these shots will escape our defined target zone due to simple inaccuracy. A match projectile on the other hand, which shoots 1 inch or less at 100 yards, 2 inches at 200, and 3 inches at 300 will remain useful inside our maximum point-blank range. With an accurate projectile, we can keep our groupings relatively close to our 6 inch diameter target zone. On the left the accurate projectile strays outside the targetable zone at its maximum ordinate and at the end of the MPBR, but still remains tight and effective. On the right, an inaccurate projectile could possibly throw rounds far outside our targetable zone and this could result in more misses. Wind can cause us a horizontal shift away from our intended goal of hitting the target. With our example of a 6 inch diameter target and a MPBR of 300 yards, I still want to be able to hit the target in a slight wind. The benefits of match ammo are two-fold: better wind resistance and tighter groupings. Both of these characteristics are just what we want when setting up our rifle or carbine. In the 20 inch gun, the Mk262 gives us an MPBR for our six-inch diameter target of 284 yards which sacrifices 16 yards from XM193… but the gains in accuracy and wind deflection make it the logical choice for a shooter who wants statistically significant gains on hit probability. As long as you do your part and shoot well, the higher accuracy and better wind resistance will reduce flyers which could land outside our intended target. Wrapping Up: So ultimately, your shooting goals should play into the rifle and its associated setup and upgrades. A red dot or BUIS set up with a MPBR zero will assist you in hitting targets of opportunity and at any distance inside your MPBR “box”. Since we cannot effectively range estimate every shot on fleeting targets, best practice would be to utilize MPBR to ensure hits by maximizing projectile trajectory as it relates to the size of our target. This method may be off-putting to those with an ACOG or similar rifle optic since it negates the benefit of the bullet drop stadia. We don’t need any BDC stadia to be riflemen. We need knowledge and best practice methodology to ensure hits at any distance. Best practice appears to be a heavy match bullet out of a rifle length platform to maximize the flat trajectory of the projectile and to take advantage of better accuracy and wind deflection. This should increase your success in hitting targets with less correction. If you are looking for accuracy then thicker barrel profiles will be stiffer and have less variance load to load. I suggest a Criterion Barrels Match Chrome Lined HBAR from Brownells. The true value of this setup is that it helps free you from thinking about your target distance in hundreds of yard increments, and instead it allows you to estimate either near or far. Is the target inside of my MPBR? Yes? Point. Squeeze. Hit. Integrating this into my setup… I foresee finalizing my optic equipped rifle with two loadings: XM193 for practice, and Hornady 75 gr HPBT for longer range work. The Hornady is considerably cheaper than the 69 grain SMK I have been shooting, and switching back and forth between the two loadings is as simple as uncapping the dial and rotating in a few clicks of elevation and windage. I think these loading’s can cover all shooting I can ever realistically do. I really like this method as it increases the probability of intersecting the target at x range inside my MPBR zone. It’s important to get away from the 100-200-300 yard paradigm and examine a zero which allows a more fluid approach to hitting a target at unknown ranges… because remember this, if nothing else; every field target will present at an unknown range. The goal of a marksman is to study the platform and integrate the best practice findings into his or her shooting. I think it is safe to say that for work inside of an MPBR of 300 yards, the 77 grain Mk 262 offers the best probability of hitting the target if shot out of a rifle length system, and its excellent characteristics make it best for environmental conditions. XM193 makes a good substitute as your holds would be the same, but the wind may knock you off target without some very light wind correction. If you are interested in a more standard AR15 zero method , check out the article linked and visit Soldier Systems. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

[Review] Smith & Wesson .500 Magnum Vs All The Things

[Review] Smith & Wesson .500 Magnum Vs All The Things

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Revolvers might be seen as a little old fashioned by some, but something to be said in their favor is the sheer size of cartridge they are able to handle. The Smith and Wesson 500 firing the .500 S&W Magnum is untapped power, the likes of which there really is almost no equal… At least in the handgun world. If you’re looking to go big game hunting, want the most powerful handgun you possibly can have, or just really like putting big holes in things — Hillperson Johnny has a great video for you! Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube for more awesome gun videos. Table of Contents Loading... The Stats And Facts While “new” might be relative, the Smith and Wesson 500 has been with us since 2003 and still holds records for power. Requiring a whole new frame, S&W developed the X-Frame as the platform for this beast of a firearm. You might be thinking that such a tank stopper of a cartridge would be grossly uncomfortable to shooting, but thankfully the designers knew what they were doing. Recoil is shockingly less than what you would expect. With rubber grips, a muzzle brake, and the pure mass of the revolver’s frame One of the muzzle brake options for the S&W Model 500 The most common barrel length is around 8″, but you can find the S&W 500 with barrels as short as 2.5″ and as long as 12″ if you look far and wide enough. A wide range of sights and muzzle devices means you can find a revolver that is right for you. Smith & Wesson 500 1150 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1150 at Brownells Compare prices (3 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabela's (See Price) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Specs: Weight: 56oz – 80oz Cartridge: 500 S&W Magnum Action: DA/SA Muzzle Velocity (approximate): 2,075fps Frame: Stainless Steel Smith & Wesson X-Frame Why Do I Need It? Other than being able to scare people standing next to you at the range, flexing on your friends, and having a handgun so freaking huge it needs a sling — the S&W 500 really does have some practical applications. First, you can destroy almost anything that needs to be atomized, such as pumpkins. Or not-very-good hot sauce Second, it makes a really good hunting handgun. Aim for the heart and lungs! If you want stopping power then 500 S&W Magnum punches the ticket. Getting the most out of it requires handloading, but even if you want to rely on factory ammo you have a huge range of great loadings ready to help take that next elk, bear, or moose you’ve been wanting to land. From 250 to 700 grains, Barnes to Hornady, lead nose to polymer tip, the available options are surprising… And expensive. For good hunting ammo, $2.50 or more per round isn’t unheard of. Hornady 500 S&W 300 GR Ammo 60 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 60 at Lucky Gunner Compare prices (2 found) Lucky Gunner (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing What you get for that cost and size is range and reliable kills out to 200 or more yards, depending on your barrel length and game. For a pistol cartridge, that kind of range is almost unheard of. By The Numbers Reliability: 5/5 It’s a Smith & Wesson revolver. It’ll run through nuclear winter. Our number one takeaway for reliability is don’t let chicken flavored dog food dry inside the chamber before cleaning. Ergonomics: 2/5 This gun is the Dolly Parton of firearms: top heavy. Accuracy: 5/5 It’s by far the most accurate 500 with a 10.5″ barrel on the market. Customization: 1/5 You can change your grips, and that’s it. Sure it’s got a whopper of a rail, but is adding a red dot really customizing? This gun is just fine the way it comes. Value: 7/5 You can’t put a price on stupid fun. Overall: 4/5 If you need to vaporize canned foods at $2+ per shot, this is your gun. Buy extra ammo cause you’ll suddenly be Mr. Popular at the range. Parting Shots The Smith & Wesson Model 500 in .500 S&W Magnum takes you into the big leagues with the most powerful production handgun in the world. Enough to bag a moose and with plenty of accuracy and reliability left over. Plus you can change the grips and add a red dot if that’s your thing. Or if you have a garage full of random stuff and you hate yard sales… Alternatively, if you’re not ready to take that second mortgage to fund this gun and a few range trips to shoot it — you might want to check your local listings for a used Model 500. Have you taken any game with your Model 500? What is your goto handload for it? Let us know in the comments! For more awesome heavy metal hunting revolvers, take a look at our hands-on review of the Ruger Super Redhawk!

Avoid 7 Common Mistakes of Wingshooting

Avoid 7 Common Mistakes of Wingshooting

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d4d41ef7_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d4d41ef7_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Once the head comes off the gun, the rear (eyes) and front (bead) sights on the gun are no longer aligned. This will most certainly cause a miss. Since the shot has been taken, was the cheek pressure released early or after the shot? Poor Timing A major problem that many shooters seem to have when shooting afield is poor timing. This can be a result of virtually anything from having the gun out of position to get it on the shoulder properly, to an inconsistent gun pace relative to the pace of the target or an overzealous trigger hand racing to mount the gun. Poor timing can be a reason for missing that might occur at any time, and can be most easily cured by proper target focus, a good gun mount and solid technique. The problems with a shooter’s timing are most often caused by a lack of concentration and an inconsistent gun swing relative to the speed, angle and distance of his target. When a shooter fails to recognize and react to these target characteristics, chances are that a miss is imminent. Timing is based on how a shooter moves relative to the movement of his target. Chances are if he overreacts to a flushing or passing bird, for instance, he will rush the gun past it before the trigger can be pulled. On the other hand, if he is slow to swing the gun when a bird presents itself, he will invariably wind up behind his target. Let’s not forget that the most accomplished wingshooters you will ever see look to be in slow motion. They only react to the speed of the bird they are attempting to harvest, and they can change their speed to compensate for the speed of the target. They do this by making sure that step one in the shot process is visual focus on a chosen target. When the birds are fast, they move fast. When they are slow, they move slow. Once a shooter’s eyes have focused on a bird, the most important part of the shot sequence is to move as the bird moves, and then a bit more to execute a chosen shooting style and complete the shot. By matching up his initial pace with that of the bird, the shooter will always be able to comfortably get his gun in position to make a clean kill, and he will find that keeping his target in view with the gun mounted will be much easier. This will be the case regardless of which shooting style is used, since the speed of the gun for pull away and swing through don’t increase until the insertion point is made. Since the rear sight on a shotgun is the shooter’s eyes, and a proper gun fit allows the gun to shoot where the shooter is looking, it is important to bring the gun to your face and focus on the target through the beads on the gun. Focusing on the Gun and Not the Target One of the more common reasons that shooters miss in the field is because they focus more on the gun than on the target. In other words, they are in effect aiming at the bird. Most shooters got their shooting legs at an early age by plinking away with a .22 caliber rifle. Unfortunately the only similarity between rifles, shotguns and pistols is that they are all classified as firearms. Shooting them is as different as day and night. In order to consistently hit a target using a precise aiming point with a rifle or pistol, the shooter must align front and rear sights with a focus primarily on the sights. In most cases the targets for rifle and pistol shooting are stationary, which allows the shooter the time to make his precise sight alignment. Herein lies the main difference between these three types of firearms. In wingshooting the targets fly at various rates of speed, and a successful shot requires the shooter to focus on the target and not the gun. Since a shotgun has no visible rear sight, the shooter’s master eye serves as the sight. As a result, the eye and the front bead on the shotgun have to align perfectly when the gun is mounted to the face and shoulder if the gun is to shoot where the eyes look. Related GunDigest Articles Modern Shooter: The Proper Defensive Handgun Grip Modern Shooter: On Safari At The FTW Ranch Modern Shooter: At H&H Precision Rifles' Shooting School In many instances, however, the shooter wants to make sure that this alignment is correct, and the tendency is to transfer the eyes from the target back to the gun. Once the eyes shift to the gun, the shooter loses touch with his target. When this happens, the shooter will attempt to find the bird again. Since the eyes lead the hands in shotgunning, the gun will go to the bird rather than to the proper lead, which in turn affects the timing of the shot. The correct procedure for the shooter to be successful is to focus on the bird while having a soft focus on the muzzle of the gun. In other words, the shooter must be aware of the gun without aiming at the target, and by looking beyond the gun and to the target, the gun should shoot where he looks. Can you see now how important visual focus is to a successful shot? Having an idea of the type of lead picture required will certainly simplify this procedure, but as we have already established, it is amazing how the eyes find the proper lead picture when the shooter does everything else right. Many rifle shooters struggle with focusing on the target, since they learned to shoot by focusing on the sights of the rifle. The learning curve to move these rifle shooters to shotgun shooters could be significant. Poor Gun Mount Once a shooter has fitted his gun properly, a large number of his misses will be a result of a poor gun mount. As alluded to earlier, the mechanics of a proper gun mount are critical to shooting success. It’s important to keep in mind that mastering the motor skills required to mount the gun consistently in the same spot on the face and shoulder every time does require practice. Unfortunately, the majority of casual bird hunters would never think of practicing gun mounts on a daily, or at least periodic basis, like many of the top clay shooters do. The difference between that casual shooter and a seasoned sporting clays enthusiast is easily noted, but both of them have to be able to mechanically mount the gun to be successful. Perhaps that’s why most competitive sporting clays shooters often fare better on live birds than their trap or skeet counterparts. Being able to properly control the movement of the gun’s muzzle starts with a mastery of the gun mount, and once the muscle movement for the mount has been memorized the shooter will find it easier to get the gun in position for a successful shot. Don’t forget that a proper gun mount is a push to the bird and insertion point and a lift of the stock to the face with the trigger hand. The hands work as a team, with neither exerting more push or lift than the other. And since gun mounts can be practiced away from the range and field, getting the proper mechanics dialed in perfectly is simply a matter of time and a desire to do so. Incorrect Technique When a shooter misses a bird because of incorrect technique, it is generally accepted that his mistakes were the result of trying to apply a certain shooting style that didn’t comfortably suit the target he was shooting. We have established that any of the various recognized shooting styles used worldwide will work for a shooter as long as the technique is applied properly. The main reason that incorrect technique misses birds is because most shooters don’t fully understand the orthodox use of recognized shooting styles. A shooter should always keep in mind that the more a bird crosses in front of him, the more forward allowance or lead will be required to successfully hit it. As a result, if he is shooting at a bird that requires a good bit of lead, it would generally be a mistake to start the gun well behind the bird to obtain that lead. At the same time, if a bird presents itself in a manner that doesn’t take much forward allowance, he can’t expect consistent success if the gun mounts too far ahead of the bird. If a shooter feels that he is well ahead of his target, chances are he’ll have problems slowing the gun to get the right lead. Regardless of which style he uses, his chances of a successful shot will improve if he remembers to match his pace with that of the bird early in the shot sequence. This will help make a precise insertion point much easier. The muzzle of the gun should be steered to the lead picture with minimal movement. This is best controlled by positioning the gun just under the armpit, with the muzzle elevation starting just under the line of the bird Stopping the Gun Certainly one of the major reasons a shooter misses could be traced to our rifle shooting heritage. Since most shooters learned to shoot by aiming a rifle or pistol, chances are they will occasionally find themselves unable to get the gun sufficiently through or ahead of the bird. When a shooter’s smoothness of swing is interrupted this way, he will invariably stop the gun. If the muzzle ever stops, even briefly, the timing of the shot will be affected and the possibilities of a miss are increased.

Aero Precision M4E1 + Atlas S-One Builders Set

Aero Precision M4E1 + Atlas S-One Builders Set

Good times are hard times. That’s the nature of the firearm industry. During hard times, things were good for manufacturers. A fearful citizenry purchased and armed up with AR15’s at a record rate. The funds from the private sector flooded players with dollars to research and develop the AR15 in exciting, and sometimes experimental, directions. Today the modular minimalist age of the AR15 has come to fruition. Lighter, modular, simpler, stronger AR15’s are what push the platform. Then Trump won. The industry flipped. Times are good, but hard. Layoffs at Daniel’s Defense. Rumors of Colt shutting down for the 100th time. Oly-Arms folding. Boutique AR retailers are evaporating. R&D has slowed down somewhat from the clamor of the Obama age… But Aero Precision apparently never got the memo . Last week they sent me a fresh receiver and rail combo that combines billet styling with forged strength. Let’s have a look at the Atlas S-One / M4E1 Builder’s set: Aero Precision Ramps Up: First off, let’s discuss my relationship with AP. They are my site sponsor and have been so for a several years. I actually approached them after buying the M4E1 because I was so impressed with the product that I wanted to see if they were interested in an advertising relationship. I felt that the M4E1 was something special… and several years later I still feel that way. It’s an awesome piece of kit!  Fast forward to last week. Aero sent out their Atlas S-One builder’s kit which consists of the M4E1 Threaded Upper* , M4E1 Lower, and Atlas S-One rail. As soon as the receiver came to my FFL I was out the door with the intent to build. *The threaded M4E1 upper is a seperate item from the M4E1 BAR handguard system. The M4E1 Threaded assembly accepts standard AR components. The Finished Overhaul. No need for a before picture… It’s not worth your time. I was sent a 15 inch Atlas S-One rail, M4E1 upper and lower receiver… All Cerakoted FDE. As you will see from the photos above and below, the kit is clean. Quality is the devil in the details; there are no chatter marks present on the receiver, magazines drop free, there is no gap between the receivers… All indicators that the set is carefully machined. Let’s take a closer look at the individual components: M4E1 Threaded Upper Receiver: The upper receiver arrived assembled. The forward assist is held in place by a threaded pin instead of a traditional roll pin. It has evidence of thread locker present from the factory. The receiver is machined with angular stylings on the outside of the receiver raceway and forward assist. There is a relieve cut into the picatinny rail for weight reduction and a stylized appearance. The receiver is forged 7075 T6 Aluminum. It accepts a standard AR15 barrel nut. The fit between the receiver and barrel extension was tight, requiring a rubber mallet to install the Ballistic Advantage barrel. Very impressed with the piece. Angular styling is present and gives the impression of a custom billet upper… yet the receiver is actually a forged component. Well made all around. The M4E1 Lower Receiver: The lower receiver arrived stripped. The lower is built for ease of assembly. One of the most difficult assemblies on a standard AR is the bolt catch and roll pin. With the M4E1, the bolt catch is held in place by a threaded pin instead of the traditional roll pin and this simplifies assembly. The receiver has well-defined roll marks. It features a stylized A on the R side of the magazine well, and regulatory roll marks on the L side of the magazine well. It follows the theme of the M4E1 product series with an angular style to corners and raised areas. The magazine well is generously flared. All magazines tested drop free including gen 2 P-Mags. The receiver also features a integrated trigger guard. Present in the rear of the receiver is a nylon tipped set screw system which allows adjusting upper and lower fitment. The rear detent hole is threaded to accept a set-screw thereby trapping the take-down pin assembly in place. This is an optional step, and I omitted it as the set-screw was not included. The Atlas S-One: The newest rail system from Aero is a “skinny” rail featuring M-LOK attachment points and three QD swivel slots. The Atlas S-One has an extended picatinny rail forward of the receiver, which then drops down to a angled “roof” at 12 o’clock, and then raises back up for several more picatinny slots at the front of the rail. The rail features M-Lok attachment points and is also available in Key-Mod. The Atlas S-One features a method of attachment to the barrel nut that I have not encountered before. The rail and barrel nut are milled to accept steel wedges that are drifted into place to trap the rail and barrel nut assembly together. Rather than use a punch, the Atlas utilizes a turnbuckle screw to bring the two locking blocks together. Looks good up close too… The barrel nut must be timed with the position of the gas tube, and slots are milled into the barrel nut to visually help with timing. The barrel nut does not interface with or trap the gas tube. Included with the barrel nut are two timing shims which I did not need to use. Gas block choice will be important as the move towards skinnier rails may limit the choice of gas block. I used the Ballastic Advantage gas block and I have one minor quibble: the gas block clearance at the bottom of the rail is tight enough that installing M-Lok accessories below the gas block lifts up on the barrel. That slot can only support rail covers so that’s a bit of a disappointment but not a deal killer in my opinion. As with all skinny rails, choose the smallest gas block you can. The weight of the barrel nut and rail assembly are 13.6 oz. Once the barrel nut is timed and torqued to spec, the rail is slid in place over the barrel, gas tube, and gas block. The two steel wedges are then installed into the turnbuckle screw and tightened into place. The assembly is now locked together. The included barrel nut and wrench won’t strip any teeth unless your arm is powered by Diesel. Of note is that the rail encapsulates the front of the receiver more so than any other rail I have recently installed. Most rails are flush with the receiver, where as the Atlas S-One extends over the front of the receiver. It features four points of anti-rotation. The anti-rotation “tabs” are quite substantial compared to other manufacturers I have encountered. Many rail manufacturers use two anti-rotation tabs which are small in comparison to those found on the Atlas S-One. I do not foresee any broken anti-rotation tabs as they are beyond robust. They are more akin to anti-rotation “wings” rather than minuscule tabs. The Atlas S-One extends on to the upper receiver and has four points of anti-rotation. The Build: I used several components from my prior carbine. I used a Ballistic Advantage barrel and VG6 Epsilon compensator. I used a USGI charging handle. USGI lower parts kit. Used buffer assembly with H2 buffer. Magpul furniture and rail covers were used exclusively. A DI Optical RV2 mounted to the forward portion of the rail rounds out the build. Of note, several forum members are concerned about the red dot’s placement on the rail. Since I will be testing this product, I will check the performance of the red dot on this portion of the rail. I will note any shifts in zero or problems. The build went together easily. The bolt catch assembly was particularly easy compared to past builds. I used blue thread-locker on the bolt catch pin. There were no assembly issues whatsoever. Total curb weight of the rifle was 6.58 lbs : this includes the weight of the Magpul BUIS set, and Magpul Type 2 rail covers. This weight omits the forward grip, magazine, and red dot sight. A standard M16 bolt carrier was used in this build. Wrapping Up: The builder’s set retails from $292.73 for the 7 inch set, to $409.47 for the Cerakoted 15 inch rail. The 15 inch anodized builder’s set retails for $346.47. Visit the product page here. I hope you can visualize from the photos that the Aero Precision Builder’s set can compete with anything on the market for fit, finish, and build quality. Aero Precision has put a lot of work into this assembly… Builder’s sets are becoming a popular item, but Aero seems to have really pushed forward with components that are thoughtfully engineered and damn good-looking to boot. I want to give them a shout out for breathing new life into the heap of parts that was my carbine! Stay tuned for a range report! 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[Guide] Situational Awareness: Head on a Swivel

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Things are a little crazy right now. A lot of people are worried and there are lots of unknowns. Today it’s COVID-19, shortages of supplies, and societal unrest things are piling up. But tomorrow it could be something else. AlienGear Shapeshift Holster Shoulder One thing you can do is to take control of what you can and pay attention to what’s going on around you. We are going to break down certain tips on how you can become more aware of your surroundings and get ahead of anything bad that could potentially happen. Put on your tinfoil hats ladies and gents! Table of Contents Loading... Exit Strategy One of the simplest things you can do to prepare yourself is to know your exits. Scanning for exit signs when indoors is quick and painless. When out and about, keeping your eyes open and processing the data that is coming in is important. If things go sideways when indoors, knowing your exit strategy ahead of time can be paramount. Crowds stampeding can be a very real danger. Especially if you are with your family and have children. Knowing the most direct route to potential safety can save lives. For all the men and women with little children, all this requires is recalibration. If you are like me, you probably try to figure out where the bathrooms are when in a new place. Toddlers, or even my pregnant wife tend to take bathroom breaks like a drunken tiny roommate. This is the same thing. Mind your exits. In an outdoor setting, this can be easier. A large group of people that may fear for their lives are still a danger, but typically there will be much more room for movement and better visibility. But here is a clue. Stay away from large groups when possible. Mob Mentality One of the biggest things to steer clear of are large groups of people. Everyone considers themselves to be upstanding individuals. The problem is when things get bad a mob can swell. At that point, normally upstanding people can sink into chaos and anarchy. During this COVID-19 crisis currently in 2020, we don’t have to worry much about large groups. At the time of this writing, most states have declared some form of quarantine or stay-at-home order. I feel it is still important to talk about the mob mentality, though. When society crumbled with Hurricane Katrina, mobs of people moved through neighborhoods looting homes and businesses. Local man loots boxes of cereal and Ramen in the wake of Hurricane Katrina During the LA riots, shop keepers took to their rooftops to protect their livelihood. Societal breakdown makes people do crazy things. This doesn’t have to be an extremely large group either. For example, while hiking with my two small children I have run into other hikers. Pandemic or not, I get my kids to close ranks when near groups or around strangers. When out and about, it’s smart to be aware of your surroundings and above all where your family is. Be a Hard Target This can be one of the harder things to accomplish for some people. For some, it’s not in their nature to be defensive, especially if you are an extrovert or outgoing. The goal isn’t necessarily to be a jerk or to have people hate you. Being a hard target involves a little “flexing” and using proper body language. Brewster Body Shield, not exactly the kind of “hard target” we’re talking about but you do you. Whether consciously or subconsciously, proper stance and body language have a huge role in being a hard target. It’s been a part of animal nature even before we were walking on this planet. Looking big, aware, and ready to handle anything dissuades predators and predatory behavior. Now for people, we can’t necessarily walk around with our hands up and growling at everyone that walks by. You can try it, but it may backfire with someone punching you in the face because you’ll look like an idiot. You also don’t need to look like a “Tactical Timmy” wearing your favorite Gruntstyle t-shirt with MultiCam pants. I learned a lot about body positioning while in the Marine Corps as a military policeman. The same stance while interviewing people is a smart approach when dealing directly with a person. Open hands at chest height with legs shoulder-width apart is a solid platform while also maintaining readiness and defensive positioning. Proper stance and body position can say a lot about someone. Stance should be upright with your head up. You can’t see what’s coming when you are staring down at the ground. Earbuds need to disappear as well. Properly hearing what’s around you is important to awareness. Spidey Sense Tingling The most important thing to rely on is your gut. If something feels wrong, act accordingly. Intuition, a sixth sense, or whatever you want to call it can save your life. When you open your other senses, your brain can take in a lot more data. That data can be used to predict what may happen next and what steps can be done. I am not saying you are a psychic by any means. This is all done by your conscious mind as well as your sub-conscious. The point is you need to unplug from typical creature comforts. That means eyes off your phone and stop listening to music. The next time you take a walk start training to be more aware of your surroundings. You might be amazed by how many people float by without paying attention to what is going on. Don’t be a sheep. Be the shepherd. Parting Shots Being situationally aware must be a full-time job. But it doesn’t mean you have to be at 100% all the time. It is a spectrum that you can slide through given your specific circumstances and assessment of danger or a threat. You don’t have to be a paranoid hermit. You just need to know when to flip that switch. Have you ever been in a dangerous or potentially dangerous situation where your situational awareness helped you stay safe? Have you ever taken any training on situational awareness? Let us know in the comments below! For some really detailed information on the defensive mindset, check out some of our selections for Best Firearm & Shooting Books . You may also be interested in the Definitive Concealed Carry Guide or for some non-lethal options the Best Stun Guns . All Tested Stun Guns

Best Gun Stuff to Buy With Your Stimulus Check

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Free money, we all love free money–right? As part of the CARES Act (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act) almost every American is getting a stimulus check and for the majority of us that check will be for at least $1,200. While many Americans have lost their jobs or had hours reduced due to COVID-19 and need that money to pay their bills, some of us are lucky . If you are still working, then you might want to use this money to stimulate the economy in the best way possible–buy stuff. Or better yet, buy American stuff . Here are just a few ways you can responsibly spend those Trumpbucks, from firearms to accessories. All of these are from American companies and many are also American made. Best Ways To Spend A Stimulus Check 1. BCM Recce-16 BCM with Magpul 40-Rounder Okay, technically this is a little over $1,200 but the extra benny is worth it. If you’re in the market for a new AR and are ready to get yourself something nice, this is the rifle for you. This isn’t a safe queen or a budget beater, this is a workhorse. If you want a SHTF rifle to trust your life to, a shooter that will be reliable and dependable though dozens of long classes, this is it. All BCM rifles are made in Heartland, Wisconsin and are held to some of the tightest quality control found in the AR industry. Sure, the fit and finish is top tier–but it’s the guts of the rifle that matter most. Bravo Company’s BCGs are legendary for their durability and reliability and the RECCE-16 comes with a chrome-lined chamber and bore for maximum longevity. BCM Recce-16 MCMR AR-15 1299 at Rainier Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1299 at Rainier Arms Prices accurate at time of writing We’ve got a complete review with a ton more details, don’t miss out! The only downside is that this is just the rifle. If you don’t already have an optic, light, sling, mags, and ammo–you might need to hold on to that check for a moment longer. 2. Build-A-Gun Aero/PSA/Brownells AR-15 If you need a whole package, we got you covered. This took some time but in our opinion here is the best “Total Package” AR-15 build you can make that costs 1 Trumpbucks. Depending on shipping and tax, you should either come out right under or right at $1,200-ish. Aero M4E1 16″ Complete Upper Aero Precision M4E1 with ATLAS Handguards This might be a little hard to find in stock, but give it a shot. It’s very close to the upper I use in my home defense AR, that’s why I trust it. This is a solid base to build a rifle you need to depend on. Full review here. Aero Precision M4E1 16" 5.56 Mid-Length Upper (ATLAS Handguard) 429 at Aero Precision Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 429 at Aero Precision Prices accurate at time of writing Palmetto State Armory Complete Lower The lower is surprisingly not an incredible important part of the AR-15. While this only comes with a milspec trigger, that’s really all you need and it’s a well made milspec trigger. PSA Complete AR-15 Lowers 150 at PSA Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 150 at PSA Prices accurate at time of writing If you want to pinch pennies, get a Classic Lower . But personally I recommend one featuring a Magpul stock like the MOE or ACS . A bit comfier and a decent upgrade for only a few bucks. Premium 5.56 Nickel Boron BCG with Carpenter 158 Bolt Always remember, the two most important parts on an AR are the BCG and the barrel. PSA’s Premium Nickel Boron BCG is one of the best for the money that you can find. PSA "Premium Nickel Boron" BCG 120 at "Palmetto State Armory" Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 120 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing Durable, well made, and the NiB coating makes it slick to improve function and to be easier to clean. Charging Handle Yeah… it’s milspec. Not my favorite by a long shot but it works and we’re on a budget. Mil-Spec AR-15 Charging Handle 22 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 22 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing If you’re willing to throw a little bit more than 1 Trumpbucks at this build I would highly recommend a Radian Raptor LT , but honestly, a milspec charging handle gets the job done. Best Lightweight Charging Handle Radian Raptor LT 56 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 56 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Sig Sauer Romeo5 Just about the whole PPT team has run a Romeo5 on at least one rifle and we’ve all been impressed. "Sig Sauer Romeo5" We’ve torture-tested them, dropped them, and really beaten the crap out of them and they still perform. Brutally Tested Budget Red Dot Sig Sauer Romeo5 149 at Palmetto State Armory Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 149 at Palmetto State Armory Compare prices (3 found) Palmetto State Armory (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing For the price it’s impossible to beat. Viking Tactics Sling My favorite sling. It’s comfy and it works outstandingly well. Right now I literally have 5 of them across my rifles and I need to pick up a couple more for rifles that are currently sling-less. Best Two-Point Sling Viking Tactics (VTAC) Sling 43 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 43 at Amazon Compare prices (2 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing If you don’t believe you don’t need a sling, you’re wrong. If this is a duty/SHTF/HD rifle then you need to have the option of having your hands free while maintaining retention. Get a sling! INFORCE WMLx White Light The exact light I run on my HD/SHTF rifle , I love it. It’s proven to be durable, bright, and handy. If you get the Aero rifle or any rifle that has M-LOK handguard then you’ll need a Picatinny rail to mount this light. InForce WMLx 144 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 144 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) OpticsPlanet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Magazines My top recommendation is always PMAGs because they are amazing. There really isn’t much else to say, make sure you get at least 3! Best Magazine Magpul 30 Round PMAG Gen M3 .223/5.56 Magazine 12 at Gun Mag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 12 at Gun Mag Warehouse Compare prices (3 found) Gun Mag Warehouse (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 3. Trijicon TA02 ACOG or Credo HX 1-8×28 FFP Rifle Scope If you already have a rifle, maybe it’s time to get a top tier optic for it. Our picks would be either the Trijicon TA02 or the Trijicon Credo HX 1-8×28 FFP LPVO. Trijicon TA-02 Acog .22 LR Minimag Damage The TA02 was the ONLY optic to survive our diabolically unfair high-end optic torture test . It is truly built to last through the most brutal conditions you can face. One of the few optic brands these days that are still making their products in America, Trijicon has a long history of producing some of the best and most durable combat-ready scopes in the world. The TA02 is one of their finest ACOGs. Trijicon ACOG TA02 4x32mm 1100 at OpticsPlanet Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1100 at OpticsPlanet Prices accurate at time of writing If fixed magnification isn’t your thing though, check out their Credo HX 1-8×28 FFP LPVO . Also built like a tank and made in America the Credo is just outstanding. Clear glass, great turrets, and the FFP reticle makes ranging your target and getting accurate hits just a matter of fieldcraft. You won’t regret putting this on your SHTF rifle! Trijicon Credo 1-8x28 FFP LPVO 1198 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1198 at Primary Arms Prices accurate at time of writing 4. Savage 11 Lightweight Hunter + SWFA SS Ultralight A lightweight, dependable, accurate hunting rifle should be a part of everyone’s armory. And here we have just the thing for you with the Savage 11 Lightweight Hunter in .308 Win and the SWFA SS 2.5-10×32 Ultralight Rifle Scope . Savage is as American as apple pie building American made rifles since 1894, including some of my favorite milsurp rifles from WWI and WWII. SWFA has been providing optics for the US Military since the early 1990s. The Savage 11 Lightweight is a gold standard for hunting rifles and this model is a nicer than average one at that. Savage 11 Lightweight Hunter .308 Win 800 at GunPrime Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 800 at GunPrime Prices accurate at time of writing Flex at the deer camp with a spiral-fluted bolt, American walnut stock stock, AccuTrigger, and a drilled and tapped receiver ready for optics. For a lightweight scope, it’s hard to beat the SWFA Ultralight . It’s a little low on magnification, but the glass is super clear, the turrets are loud and feel great, and the reticle is everything you need with nothing you don’t. SWFA SS Ultralight 2.5-10x scope, outstanding glass quality! Plus… it’s just so lightweight. Really, this comes in at just 9.5 ounces and feels amazing. Take a peek at the complete review ! SWFA SS Ultralight 2.5-10x32mm 400 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 400 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing 5. Ruger Precision Rifle The world of long range precision shooting is one of the hardest and most rewarding shooting disciplines. And I’m not just saying that because it’s my favorite. This is a great time to get into the hobby, and the "Ruger Precision Rifle" is one of the best starter rifles on the market. Best Long-Range Beginner's Bang For The Buck Ruger Precision Rifle 1200 at GunPrime Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1200 at GunPrime Compare prices (3 found) GunPrime (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing We have a full review on the RPR in 6.5 Creedmoor, but the highlights are that this is the third generation of the rifle and each generation has been better than the last. A huge selling point of the RPR is that out of the box it’s a great rifle, but it is also designed to be upgraded with the shooter. Ruger Precision Rifle It has the ability to take AR-15 grips, accepts both AICS and SR25 magazines, will work with any buffer-tube based stock like the Magpul PRS or Luth MBA, and has a M-LOK handguard that is easy to swap out. Personally, my advice would be that if you’re looking to use this to complete in local matches — grab a Catalyst Arms FAST TRACK Arca Rail handguard for your RPR. Catalyst Arms FAST TRACK on a 6.5 Grendel AR-15 used while testing the whole range of Kestrel Weather Stations This will open up some of the best options for bipods and tripods and give you a flat, firm base to shoot off bags with. 6. CZ Shadow 2 CZ itself isn’t American, but CZ-USA has been making guns in the USA for several years now. So your money is still going to American workers. We kind of have to admit it, we love CZ guns. The P-01 is one of my CCW guns, and our boss’s 3-gun pistol is a CZ SP-01 . The Shadow 2 is one of the best competition guns on the market, period. It’s based off the CZ SP-01 but has a boatload of upgrades straight from the factory. A higher beavertail, undercut trigger guard, heavier slide for recoil control, swappable mag release, and an improved trigger for an even smoother and lighter pull in both DA and SA. Top it off it has a fiber optic front sight, serrated HAJO rear adjustable sight, and some snazy blue grip panels. This is one fine piece of steel. CZ Shadow 2 1100 at GunPrime Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1100 at GunPrime Prices accurate at time of writing Personally, this is on my short list for what I’ll do with my Trumpbucks. 7. Dan Wesson Vigil Make a list of the top 5 most American guns and the 1911 will be in the top place every time. With the huge range of great 1911s on the market right now, it’s hard to narrow it down to just one. But for me, for $1,200, my pick is the "Dan Wesson Vigil" . Dan Wesson is now owned by CZ, but they are still American run and American made. DW has been making outstanding 1911s for a long time and are one of the top names in great guns. Smooth as glass and for a reasonable price. Well… “reasonable” for the quality at least. The Vigil wins my vote because it comes with a threaded barrel and suppressor height night sights. .45 ACP is a great caliber for loads of things, but something it does best is be suppressed. Dan Wesson Vigil Suppressor-Ready .45 ACP 1258 at Ky Gun Co Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1258 at Ky Gun Co Prices accurate at time of writing Maybe you already have .45 ACP pistol can, maybe you need a reason to get one. Well, after you buy the Vigil–you will. 8. Burris XTR2 5-25x50mm Get the deep-dive review on the Burris XTR2 here , but the short version is that this is a serious piece of glass. If you already have a long range rifle and are ready to put the glass on it that it deserves, this is a great option. Burris XTR II 25x Tracking is perfect, turrets are strong, glass is clear. Mounted Burris XTR II The eye box is a little unforgiving and the turrets can be considered stiff, but the selling point is the glass and overall build quality. Burris XTR2 5-25x50mm 1100 at EuroOptic Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1100 at EuroOptic Compare prices (3 found) EuroOptic (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Optics Planet (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 9. Hard Head Veteran + AR500 Armor Body armor is generally not something most of us will ever need… but if you’re looking at really upping your SHTF kit, it’s a logical choice to make. AR500 Armor and Hard Head Veterans are two top of the line brands for your body armor needs. We’ve tested AR500 Armor plates first hand and have great results. Their plate carries are also well made, well designed, and comfy… as much as wearing a dozen or more pounds of armor can be comfy at least. HHV only sells two helmets , an ATE option, and a MICH/ACH option, and they aren’t too flashy. What they are is high quality and produced by a company you can trust and feel good supporting. HHV Gen 1 vs Gen 2 , Rails You can mix and match the armor and carrier you want, but I did the napkin math and a maxed out, top of the line Testudo Fully Loaded Package with level III+ Lightweight plates, side plates, trauma pad, pistol holster, magazine pouches, and more plus a HHV Ballistic ATE Helmet combined comes to just under $1,200. Perfect for the Apocalypse. 10. Mossberg JM 940 Pro Series There are SO MANY awesome shotguns on the market, but for the best American shotgun you can find–Mossberg is the clear winner. Since 1919 Mossberg has been producing some of the best shotguns on the market and all of them made in America. Mossberg JM 940 Pro The JM 940 Pro actually comes in at a good bit under our price cap leaving you lots of room for ammo! But finding one in stock right now is going to be… well, good luck with that. This is the latest and greatest version of the JM Pro Series, Mossberg teamed up with legendary Jerry Miculek to design the best out-of-the-box competition shotgun they could and wow did they do it! We got to play with one for a bit at SHOT this year and were very impressed, especially for the price. Mossberg JM Pro 940 996 at GunPrime Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 996 at GunPrime Compare prices (3 found) GunPrime (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Kentucky Gun Co (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing A quick rundown on this shotty is the redesigned gas system allowing for upto 1500 rounds fired before cleaning, nickel boron coated internal parts for durability and smooth function, competition-sized loading port, elevator, and follow for quick and easy quad-loading. Find one in stock and buy it on first sight . You’ll love it. 11. 80% Project Guns If you’re not totally sick of DIY projects and finishing off that “honey-do” list you’ve been letting build-up for the past… forever , then you might be interested in building some 80% firearms! Some 80% AR-15 Receivers When it comes to 80% firearms your two major options are the AR-15 and Glock pattern guns, plus some extras like AR-10s. For an AR-15 or AR-10 build our top pick is always 80% Arms . What really sets them apart from the pack is the Easy Jig Gen 2 , perfect for multiple projects! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6uqQP-oRg38 Easy Jig Gen 2 Multi-Platform 250 at 80% Arms Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 250 at 80% Arms Prices accurate at time of writing Polymer80 has everything you need for any polymer based build, both AR and Glock platform. Personally, we love their Glock lowers! Various Polymer 80 Glocks We’ve built just a few of them, and every single one has run outstanding. Plus there is almost as much customization for them as there is for the AR platform. Full P80 guide here . From Faxon to Zev, slides to sights, lights to triggers , you can turn out as many custom Gucci builds as your budget allows. Go wild! Best 80% Glock Frame Polymer80 Glock Frame Kit 149 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 149 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 12. Project Black TR2 Tactical Respirator Since masks are looking like they are going to be in fashion for the foreseeable future, you might want to drop some of that stimulus check on getting the Cadillac of face masks. TR2 Project Black mask Project Black TR2 is a new to the market tactical respirator with some major upgrades over what is available now. Specially designed with operators in mind, this respirator is shaped and sized to allow you to still wear eye protection, ear protection, and to have a good cheek-weld on a rifle. And if you’re like us and shaving has gone by the wayside during quarantine (okay, not like we shaved much before either…) the TR2’s face seal is designed to work with facial hair and still provide a seal. TR2 Project Black Best of all this is uses an easy to replace filter cartridge, so it’s going to last. Project Black is the tactical arm of O2 Canada, a well-established mask and respirator manufacture. Project Black Tactical Respirator II 225 at Project Black Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 225 at Project Black Prices accurate at time of writing We’ll have a complete review of Project Black’s TR2 soon! Charitable Contributions A much-overlooked part of the CARES act was an expansion of the charitable contribution tax breaks for this year. There are some special rules and options for business and individuals who take an itemized deduction, but the one that will apply to most of us who take the Standard Deduction is the $300 Above-The-Line Deduction . If you take a Standard Deduction, the CARES act allows you to give up to $300 cash in charitable contributions and get a tax break on your 2020 Adjusted Gross Income. Many of us, our friends, family, and neighbors are going to have some very rough times ahead. If you have the room in your budget, consider donating to some good causes. For the first $300 you’ll also get a tax break, so that’s nice. Parting Shots These are most of the cool ideas we had for ways to spend a stimulus check, but there are lots more! Stay safe out there everyone, wash your hands, and be a good neighbor when you can. What are your ideas to stimulate the economy? Planing on buying American? Let us know in the comments! To stay up-to-date with the best ways to blow your money, check the Daily Deals –we add awesome deals and sales we find every day! And here’s some more popular big categories: Best AR-15s Best Rifle Scopes Best Beginner Handguns Best Place to "Buy Ammo Online" Best AR-15 Upgrades Best Rifle Flashlights

Summary

If you had to rely on one zero, what would it be? For a long time, the mantra has been that the 50 / 200 yard zero is the most useful zero for the AR15 platform as it offers a flat trajectory for the 5. 56 cartridge. It is good advice and I have a few rifles zero’ed for 50 myself, but it’s not the “best zero”.